Facts

Russian/NATO Designation S-300P/SA-10 Grumble[1]
Variants S-300PS & S-300PM/SA-20 Gargoyle[2]
Mobility and Role Ground-based/Road-mobile; Short- to medium-range air and missile defense[3]
Designer/Producer Almaz/Almaz-Antey[4]
Missiles and Range 48N6E (150 km); 5V55R (75 km)[5]
Targets Cruise Missiles, low-flying aircraft, short-range ballistic missiles[6]
Status/Exports Deployed/ Exported to China, Iran, Algeria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Kazakhstan, Serbia, Slovakia, Syria, and Vietnam.[7]

 

Overview

The Soviet Union initiated the development of the S-300P in the late 1960s.[8] The system was first deployed in 1982 and was designed to detect, track, and destroy incoming cruise missiles and low-flying aircraft. Subsequent versions, the S-300PS and the S-300PM, were also designed to destroy ballistic missiles and are currently operationally deployed.[9] However, the Russian Federation ceased production of the S-300PS in March 2012.[10] The S-300PS and S-300PM (NATO Designation: SA-20 Gargoyle) systems are land-based and road-mobile.[11] They use the Russian 48N6E single-phase, solid-fuel missile that has a range of 150 km and a maximum altitude of 30 km, and the 5V55R with a range of 75 km.[12] A full S-300 battalion includes a command-and-control vehicle, an engagement radar vehicle, an acquisition radar vehicle, and six launch vehicles that carry four missile containers each, for a total of 24 missiles.[13] The long-range surveillance radar is called the Big Bird and has a tracking range of over 300 km.[14] For target tracking and fire-control, the S-300P employs a phase array radar with a range of 40 km and the ability to track and engage up to six targets simultaneously.[15] S-300P launch vehicles are capable of firing five minutes after stopping and, in accordance with Russian shot-doctrine, the system fires two interceptors within three seconds to defend against one incoming target.[16] Russia has exported variations of the S-300P system to several different countries including China, Iran, and Syria.[17]

Recent News

    References

    [1] “S-300P” Military Today http://www.military-today.com/missiles/s300p.htm

    [2] “Profile: Russia’s S-300 Missile System” BBC. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-22652131

    [3] Dr. Kopp, Carlo. “Almaz S-300P/PT/PS/PMU/PMU1/PMU2; Almaz-Antey S-400 Triumf; SA-10/20/21 Grumble/Gargoyle” Air Power Australia. http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-Grumble-Gargoyle.html

    [4] “S-300 Surface-to-Air Missile System” Aerospace Daily & Defense Report. August 2015

    [5] Dr. Kopp, Carlo. “Almaz S-300P/PT/PS/PMU/PMU1/PMU2; Almaz-Antey S-400 Triumf; SA-10/20/21 Grumble/Gargoyle” Air Power Australia. http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-Grumble-Gargoyle.html

    [6] Ibid

    [7] “S-300 Surface-to-Air Missile System” Aerospace Daily & Defense Report. August 2015

    [8] Dr. Kopp, Carlo. “Almaz S-300P/PT/PS/PMU/PMU1/PMU2; Almaz-Antey S-400 Triumf; SA-10/20/21 Grumble/Gargoyle” Air Power Australia. http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-Grumble-Gargoyle.html

    [9] “S-300 Surface-to-Air Missile System” Aerospace Daily & Defense Report. August 2015

    [10] Ibid

    [11] Ibid

    [12] Dr. Kopp, Carlo. “Almaz S-300P/PT/PS/PMU/PMU1/PMU2; Almaz-Antey S-400 Triumf; SA-10/20/21 Grumble/Gargoyle” Air Power Australia. http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-Grumble-Gargoyle.html

    [13] “Profile: Russia’s S-300 Missile System” BBC. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-22652131

    [14] Dr. Kopp, Carlo. “Almaz S-300P/PT/PS/PMU/PMU1/PMU2; Almaz-Antey S-400 Triumf; SA-10/20/21 Grumble/Gargoyle” Air Power Australia. http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-Grumble-Gargoyle.html

    [15] Ibid

    [16] “Profile: Russia’s S-300 Missile System” BBC. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-22652131

    [17] “S-300 Surface-to-Air Missile System” Aerospace Daily & Defense Report. August 2015

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