Facts

Pakistan/U.S. Designation Shaheen-II/Hatf-6
Missile Variants Shaheen-I
Mobility and Role Road-mobile/surface-to-surface Medium-Range Ballistic Missile
Designer/Producer Pakistan
Range 2,000km
Warhead Type and Weight Nuclear or Conventional/700kg
MIRV and Yield No MIRV capabilities/15-35kt
Guidance System/Accuracy Inertial/GPS/250m CEP
Stages/Propellant Multistage/Solid
IOC/Retirement 2014/Still in service
Status/Number of Units Operational/ N/A

Development

The Shaheen-II or Hatf-6 is a medium or intermediate range ballistic missile with a solid fuel source and is road-mobile. The Shaheen-II has a range of 2,000km,  [1]  with an estimated ability to strike its target within at least 350m radius. [2] It is unknown what the estimated payload of the missile is, however, there are plans for a conventional and nuclear warhead . [3] The Shaheen-II appears to be a reversed engineered version of the Chinese M-18. [4] Some reports indicated the missile was developed in association with Chinese engineers. [5] It is unknown if the Shaheen-II has been operationally deployed. The Shaheen-II was paraded during the Pakistan Day celebration of 2000 but was not tested until March of 2004. [6] After the initial test, the Pakistani Military continued to test the Shaheen Missile for a total of six tests. [7] There is some speculation that the Shaheen-II was developed to replace the Ghauri missile. [8]

Strategic Implications

Fist the development of the Shaheen-II increases Pakistan’s strike range into India. However, this added capability may come at a cost. There are suggestions that if Pakistan continues to develop more advance missile technologies that Pakistan could face increased sanctions from the United States. [9] However, the increase in Pakistan’s missile technology could lead to other nations in the South Asia region to develop their own missile programs in order to defend themselves. [10]  Due to the Shaheen-II’s range and accuracy it is believed that the Shaheen II is a counter value missile. [1]


Sources

[1] “Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threat,” Air Force ISR Agency, accessed July 3, 2014,http://www.afisr.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-130710-054.pdf.

[2] Richard Fisher, “Pakistan’s Long Range Ballistic Missiles: A View from Ideas,” International Assessment and Strategy Center, November 1, 2004, accessed July 8, 2014,http://www.strategycenter.net/research/pubid.47/pub_detail.asp.

[3] Hans Kristensen and Robert Norris, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Forces,” Bul, 2011, accessed July 9, 2014,http://bos.sagepub.com/content/67/4/91.

[4] “Ghaznavi/shaheen-Ii – Pakistan Missile Special Weapons Delivery System,” Federation of American Scientists, accessed July 9, 2014,  http://fas.org/nuke/guide/pakistan/missile/shaheen-2.htm .

[5] Richard Fisher, “Pakistan’s Long Range Ballistic Missiles: A View from Ideas,” International Assessment and Strategy Center, November 1, 2004, accessed July 8, 2014,http://www.strategycenter.net/research/pubid.47/pub_detail.asp.

[6] “Ghaznavi/shaheen-Ii – Pakistan Missile Special Weapons Delivery System,” Federation of American Scientists, accessed July 9, 2014,  http://fas.org/nuke/guide/pakistan/missile/shaheen-2.htm .

[7]   “Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threat,” Air Force ISR Agency, accessed July 3, 2014,http://www.afisr.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-130710-054.pdf.

[8] Hans Kristensen and Robert Norris, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Forces,” Bul, 2011, accessed July 9, 2014,http://bos.sagepub.com/content/67/4/91 .

[9] Reshmi Kazi, “Shaheen-Ii Test: Ramifications for India,” Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, March 18, 2004, accessed July 9, 2014,  http://www.ipcs.org/article/defence/shaheen-ii-test-ramifications-for-india-1345.html .

[10] Ibid.

[11] Ibid.

[1]    Hans Kristensen and Robert Norris, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Forces,” Bul, 2011, accessed July 9, 2014,http://bos.sagepub.com/content/67/4/91.

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