Facts

Pakistan/U.S. Designation Ghaznavi/Hatf-3
Missile Variants N/A
Mobility and Role Road-mobile/surface-to-surface Short-Range Ballistic Missile
Designer/Producer Pakistan
Range 250km
Warhead Type and Weight Nuclear or Conventional/500kg
MIRV and Yield No MIRV capabilities/ N/A
Guidance System/Accuracy Inertial/250m CEP
Stages/Propellant Single/Solid
IOC/Retirement 2004/Still in service
Status/Number of Units Operational/ N/A

Development

The Ghaznavi, or Hatf- 3, is a short range ballistic missile with a range of 250km. [1] It has a solid fuel and is also road-mobile with a 12-wheel transporter erector launcher. Originally, the Ghaznavi was developed from studying Chinese M-11 missiles. These missiles were delivered to Pakistan in 1987 as well as reportedly giving Pakistan the blueprints to a U-235 nuclear device. [2] After being inhibited by U.S. sanction the development process restarted in 1995. The project was given to the National Defense Complex (NDC) which utilized resources from other projects such as Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission. Eventually, U.S. intelligence said that Pakistan had the ability to create “precise duplicates” of Chinese M-11 missiles. [3] It was introduced in 2004 with an estimated 500 kg payload. [4] The Ghaznavi was test launched in May of 2010. [5] Further tests were conducted in May of 2014 as part field exercises. [6]

Strategic Implications

The Ghaznavi does not have the long range of the Shaheen or the Ghauri missile, but it would be capable striking into Indian territory. [7]  Furthermore, it contributes to Pakistan’s nuclear deterrence against India. The road-mobile missile would help the Pakistani military force from being neutralized by a preemptive or first strike as they becoming hard to find by remaining mobile. [8]  Theoretically, the Ghaznavi could be deployed against conventional Indian forces if there was a confrontation. [9] It has been suggested that the Ghaznavi was more about developing the technology for the Shaheen and Ghauri missiles. [10]


Sources

[1] “Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threat,” Air Force ISR Agency, accessed July 3, 2014,http://www.afisr.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-130710-054.pdf.

[2] “Hatf-3 Pakistan Special Weapons Delivery Systems,” Federation of American Scientists, accessed July 3, 2014, http://fas.org/nuke/guide/pakistan/missile/hatf-3.htm .

[3] Ibid

[4] Hans Kristensen, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Forces,” Bulletin for the Atomic Scientist, 2011, accessed July 3, 2014,http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1177/0096340211413360.

[5] Ibid

[6] “Pakistan Test-Fires Nuclear-Capable Short-Range Missile ‘hatf Iii’,” The Times of India, accessed July 3, 2014,http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/pakistan/Pakistan-test-fires-nuclear-capable-short-range-missile-Hatf-III/articleshow/34838722.cms .

[7] Hans Kristensen, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Forces,” Bulletin for the Atomic Scientist, 2011, accessed July 3, 2014,http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1177/0096340211413360.

[8] “Hatf-3 Pakistan Special Weapons Delivery Systems,” Federation of American Scientists, accessed July 3, 2014, http://fas.org/nuke/guide/pakistan/missile/hatf-3.htm .

[9] Hans Kristensen, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Forces,” Bulletin for the Atomic Scientist, 2011, accessed July 3, 2014,http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1177/0096340211413360.

[10] Ibid,

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