Ghauri

Development

The Ghauri, or Hatf-5, is a medium or intermediate-range ballistic missile with a range of 1,250 km. This missile is liquid fueled and is considered to be road-mobile. [1]   Finding the technological limits of the Chinese M-11 missile, Pakistan had to find a different source to base their missile on. Analysis of the Ghauri suggests that Pakistan based the missile off of North Korea’s Nodong design. [2]   In April of 1998 Pakistan successfully tested the Ghauri, which flew 700 km, well short of a proposed 1,500 km. Pakistan also responded to the Indian Agni-II test with another test of the Ghauri in April of 1999 which reportedly struck a target 1,100 km. [3] The missile was introduced to the Indian military in 2003. [4] Some analysts theorize that the Ghauri benefits from North Korea’s payload spin technology. This spin, like a bullet from a rifle would help stabilize a missile. [5]

Furthermore, the Ghauri has an estimated 1,000 kg payload in either conventional or nuclear weaponry.  There are reports of a modified Ghauri, or Ghuari-2, which has an increased strike range that includes all of India.[6] Along with the Shaheen-I, the Ghauri appears to be the answer to India’s Prithvi and Agni missile series. The time line of development for the Pakistani missiles and the Indian missiles remain closely together. [7] Since 2007 the testing of the Ghauri has slowed due to international pressure as well as an increased focus on cruise missiles and tactical nuclear weapons. [8] However, Pakistan still tested the Ghauri missile in November of 2012. [9]

Strategic Implications

With the Ghauri, New Delhi has become a viable strategic target for Pakistani forces. [10] In addition to New Delhi other population centers and military forces are in range of the Ghauri missile. [11] The Ghauri is considered to be Pakistan’s line of Strategic deterrence. [12]   Furthermore, Pakistan does not have a no-first use policy making the Ghauri an effective first strike weapon. [13]

References

[1] “Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threat,” Air Force ISR Agency, accessed July 3, 2014,http://www.afisr.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-130710-054.pdf.

[2] “Ghauri [hatf-5]-pakistan Missile Special Delivery System,” Federation of American Scientists, accessed July 3, 2014,http://fas.org/nuke/guide/pakistan/missile/hatf-5.htm.

[3] Ibid

[4] Hans Kristensen, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Forces,” Bulletin for the Atomic Scientist, 2011, accessed July 3, 2014,http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1177/0096340211413360.

[5] “Ghauri [hatf-5]-pakistan Missile Special Delivery System,” Federation of American Scientists, accessed July 3, 2014,http://fas.org/nuke/guide/pakistan/missile/hatf-5.htm

[6] “Country Profile Pakistan: Missiles,” Nuclear Threat Initiative, accessed July 3, 2014,  http://www.nti.org/country-profiles/pakistan/delivery-systems/ .

[7] Ibid

[8] Ibid

[9] Zeenews Bureau, “Pak Test Fires N-Capable Hatf v Ghauri Missile,” ZeeNews, November 29, 2012, accessed July 3, 2014, http://zeenews.india.com/news/south-asia/pak-test-fires-n-capable-hatf-v-ghauri-missile_813368.html .

[10] Ibid

[11] Ibid

[12] [12] “Ghauri [hatf-5]-pakistan Missile Special Delivery System,” Federation of American Scientists, accessed July 3, 2014,http://fas.org/nuke/guide/pakistan/missile/hatf-5.htm.

[13] Ibid.,

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